NSFW ice cream? Little Baby's shows its new package

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A little ice cream company drew outsize reaction with its first viral ad. Now a new one exposes another level of offbeat

After a big scoop of viral success with one disturbing online video, an independent ice cream company in Philadelphia today put the cherry on top with an ad that pushes the envelope while promoting its new pint-size packages.

Little Baby’s Ice Cream’s "Check Out Our New Package," created by Philadelphia’s All Ages Productions, features a fountain of vanilla coming from an unexpected place  — not standard fare for the family-friendly ice cream market.

Little Baby’s co-owner Pete Angevine said the spot came simultaneously with the company's introduction of a biodegradable pint package and a distribution deal that extends the brand throughout the Mid-Atlantic states.

Little Baby’s garnered millions of views — and a frothy mix of controversy — with its last video (released August 3, 2012, the day the company opened its first shop after selling from a tricycle since spring 2011). That earlier video (which, coincidentally, Campaign US featured today as the second-creepiest ad of all time) stars a person made of ice-cream lovingly eating his own head.

Angevine said responses to that video "got the full spectrum. Half of the folks were unreasonably upset. We would get one call from a mom screaming that her child would never eat ice cream again, and then a mom in Sweden would call to buy a T-shirt. ... That was a little more than three years ago, and we still get prank phone calls." (The company’s Contact Us page encourages callers to "yell at us about our YouTube video/"advertisement.")

And what does Angevine thing about provoking such strong reactions in a category usually aimed at families? "We’ve always held the view that ice cream is for everyone," he said, citing the range of dairy and non-dairy flavors available to Little Baby’s customers as an example of its eclecticism. "It’s not intended to target any demographic; we’re just trying to get the word out as far and wide as possible.

"All great art is divisive," Angevine mused.